Mechanical Services Helps Hyde School Score A+ on Natural Gas Conversion

The historic Hyde Mansion sits atop a gentle sloping hill on The Hyde School campus in Bath, striking a Maine parallel to the current PBS hit series, Downton Abbey.
Chris Green explaining the natural gas conversion of the Hyde School to WCSH-TV reporter, Tim Goff.

Bath, Maine (April 11, 2013) — The historic Hyde Mansion sits atop a gentle sloping hill on The Hyde School campus in Bath, striking a Maine parallel to the current PBS hit series, Downton Abbey. While education is their main focus, school officials are pleased with the recent conversion from oil to natural gas. Their investment has a one-year pay back, scoring an A+ for energy savings and sound business planning.

“The transition from oil to gas was seamless,” remarks Hyde School Executive Business Manager Cindy Morgan. Hyde School worked with Mechanical Services, a statewide HVAC company starting in September of 2012 after the pipeline was installed last summer.

Fourteen buildings on campus are now heated with natural gas from the Hyde Mansion to the newly constructed residence hall. “Each building presented a different set of issues and Mechanical Services worked with us to create unique solutions,” says George Paton, Hyde School facilities manager.

New technology installed by Mechanical Services will help the Bath, Maine school save energy and money.
Learn more about Hyde School project.

“The Hyde School conversion to natural gas is a perfect example of how new technology is helping save energy and money in ways unimaginable when the facility was built a century ago,” says Mechanical Services President Chris Green. “The original heat source was coal and our team thrived on creating solutions to meet each job’s specifications.”

Underneath the mansion’s gracefully-appointed rooms, oil-fired steam boilers are equipped with state of the art Webster natural gas burners with an Autoflame Combustion Management system. In addition, Mechanical Services installed a code compliant stainless steel lining system in the 100-year old chimney.